Author Topic: Fragment / Splinter Selves  (Read 66 times)

Offline Deb

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"(Jane continues:) In a sense the present individual in any given life could be called a fragment of his entire entity, having all the properties of the original entity, though they remain latent or unused."

"As for others all fragments have (pause) are throwoffs or projections. Difficult to explain, I am not doing well. In a physical sense this board is a projection of wood or a tree, but in this case the board has less properties than the parent tree. The tree can grow, the board cannot. A personality fragment on the other hand never has less properties than its parent. This is the difference. A personality fragment has all the properties of its parents inherent, though it may not know how to use them. The board however cannot learn to grow, even though you stick it in the earth."
—TES1 Session 9 December 18, 1963

"You could not appreciate nor understand, nor can I, the nature of identity as it is known in the overall. What we know of identity represents fragments and splinters that we call ourselves. These are part however of the prime identity. The splinters are possessed of individuality, and such units will never be dissolved."  TES8 Session 338 May 1, 1967

Offline Sena

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Quote from: Deb
The splinters are possessed of individuality, and such units will never be dissolved." 
Thanks Deb, I think this is very significant. So it would seem that we humans are ultimately personality fragments (splinters) of All That Is.

 

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