Author Topic: Music from Space Odyssey 2001  (Read 115 times)

Offline Sena

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The character of Zarathustra in Nietzsche is someone who "created his own reality". Richard Strauss wrote an opera based on Nietzsche's book. Stanley Kubrick used Richard Strauss's music in his movie, Space Odyssey 2001:

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Offline LarryH

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I just happen to be reading 3001: The Final Odyssey right now.
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Offline jbseth

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Hi All,

Another awesome synchronistic event.  :)


Hi Sena, I hope you don't mind, but I'll continue on a little bit with some other very interesting "connections".

The book and screenplay for 2001, was written by Arthur C Clark.  Arthur C Clark was a science fiction writer, who wrote another book, "Childhoods End" in 1953. Jane Roberts, also a writer, wrote some science fictions stories in the same general timeframe, the 1950's. Childhood's End is a story about humans who get visited by "Aliens" from elsewhere and then later as a result of this, the human species evolves beyond all recognition.

Jane Roberts channeled Seth, an "Alien" from elsewhere, who tells us of a probable upcoming "Second Coming" event around the year 2075, where afterward mankind will evolve to a point beyond all recognition.

Then, along with all of this, Seth also talks about how we  "create our reality".


Does anyone else have any other interesting "connections" here?

-jbseth


 
 


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Offline Sena

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Quote from: jbseth
Another awesome synchronistic event. 
jbseth/Larry,
My thoughts about Nietzsche, Zarathustra, and the film music came to me sort of out of the blue this morning.

Offline LarryH

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Quote from: jbseth
Does anyone else have any other interesting "connections" here?
Zarathustra was also known as Zoroaster. When I was in 7th grade, I chose to write a paper on Zoroaster. When I was in my 20's, a psychic told me that in a past incarnation, I was the right-hand man of Zoroaster. I don't believe this for a minute, but I found it interesting at the time that the psychic may have picked up my prior interest in this person. This practicing psychic was a friend for a few years and did offer several unsolicited precognitive impressions about me from time to time that were accurate. But I found his past-life claims about me to be highly suspect.

jbseth, you mentioned Childhood's End. That is my favorite A. C. Clark novel.
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Offline jbseth

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Quote from: Sena
My thoughts about Nietzsche, Zarathustra, and the film music came to me sort of out of the blue this morning.


Hi Sena, Hi LarryH, Hi All,

Look at what your thoughts have started today, Sena, “Awesome”.  :)



Quote from: LarryH
jbseth, you mentioned Childhood's End. That is my favorite A. C. Clark novel.


LarryH, I think it’s also probably mine as well. I really like that story. I really feel a strong link between it and some of what Seth had to say about the possible future of mankind.



I’ve always been attracted to some aspects of the Zoroasterian religion. I think maybe its because of its association with fire. Campfires and fireplaces are wonderful places. They bring to mind mystical and/or spiritual contemplation. Ahhhhh.



More possible connections:

I also tend to think that from history, the Zoroasterian religion probably had a major impact on both the Hebrew religion and the Christian religion. As I understand it, after Babylonia took over the Jewish peoples and their lands in about 600 BC, it was the Persians, about 100 years later who overthrew the Babylonians.  The Persians, who let the Jewish people return to their ancient homelands, I believe practiced the Zoroasterian religion. The Zoroasterian religion is loosely based upon a belief of a powerful being of Good, a powerful being of Evil, a final battle between good and evil and a final judgement scenario afterward.

It was some time after this exposure to the Persians, that the Hebrews started to develop their own apocalyptic and end of the world ideas, including a coming “Messiah”, an end of the world battle and a mass judgement scenario.

Then Jesus was born. Some thought that he was this Jewish Messiah, others came to believe that he was God and Christianity became a major religion that has existed for the last 2,000 years.

Today we have many Christians who anticipate a “Second Coming” of “Christ”, a final battle, Armageddon, and a final judgement scenario.  Then along with this, today we also have Seth’s teachings and Seth talks about both Jesus and the second coming event.

All possibly linking back to Zoroaster or, as some call him, Zarathustra.



-jbseth




Offline jbseth

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Hi Sena, Hi LarryH, Hi All,

Wow. Here's another interesting connection I just discovered.  Today on Bing, they mentioned that today, Novermber 14, many Hindu’s celebrate Diwali. Which is a festival of lights and symbolizes the spiritual victory of light over darkness, good over evil and knowledge over ignorance.

http://www.bing.com/search?q=rangoli+diwali&form=hpcapt&filters=HpDate:"20201114_0800"


The Zoroasterian religion was a religion having to do with “good verses evil” and today, the Hindus celebrate Diwali, the celebration of “good over evil”.


-jbseth



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Offline Deb

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Quote from: jbseth
Does anyone else have any other interesting "connections" here?

"I'm sorry Dave, I can't do that." ;)

How about this? The one thing I remember about Arthur C. Clark is that he lived in Colombo, Sri Lanka. He moved there from England in 1956, when it was called Ceylan. He was the only person I "knew" that lived in Sri Lanka until Sena joined us here.

Clark used to have his own TV show in the 80s about unexplained phenomena that I enjoyed. I think the show intro showed him walking outdoors on a beach or something with lush green hills in the distance and I thought it was the most beautiful place ever.
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Offline jbseth

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Quote from: Deb
I'm sorry Dave, I can't do that


Hi Deb, Hi All,

I wondered whether anyone was going to mention that. :)


-jbseth

Offline leidl

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Quote from: Deb
"I'm sorry Dave, I can't do that."

 ;D

The connection I make: when we are confronted with something we do not understand  (a monolith, a work whose origins are mysterious, outside of normal comprehension, Seth/Elias) if we remain in a place of wonder and awe, a place beyond the labels of "good" and "evil" (Nietzsche), then, from that place of silence, that place of no judgement and even no thought, comes self-transcendence (the babe).

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Offline Sena

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Quote from: LarryH
When I was in my 20's, a psychic told me that in a past incarnation, I was the right-hand man of Zoroaster.
Larry, the synchronicities (coincidences) pile up!

Offline Sena

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Quote from: leidl
a place beyond the labels of "good" and "evil" (Nietzsche),
leidl, that's a good connection. Seth/Elias/Nietzsche - Beyond Good and Evil.

Offline Sena

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Quote from: jbseth
The Zoroasterian religion was a religion having to do with “good verses evil” and today, the Hindus celebrate Diwali, the celebration of “good over evil”.
jbseth, it appears that Nietzsche may have made his Zarathustra the opposite of the Persian Zoroaster:

"In 1885 Nietzsche finished writing Thus Spoke Zarathustra, in which he has the prophet proclaim many Nietzschean ideas in parables and epiphets. Constantine Sandis asks why Nietzsche particularly chose Zarathustra.
In M. Night Shyamalan’s superhero film Unbreakable, the fragile-boned Elijah believes that somewhere out there he has an enemy with the exact opposite property, whom he eventually identifies as the ‘unbreakable’ security guard David Dunn. A similar kind of reasoning led Nietzsche to name the protagonist of his religious parody Thus Spoke Zarathustra (1883-5) after Zoroaster (‘Zarathustra’ is a Westernised version of the name). Nietzsche viewed the Persian prophet as his arch rival: an opponent of similar power and stature, whom he admired but could never fully overcome. In the character of ‘Zarathustra’, Nietzsche attempts to create his own spokesman worthy of Zoroaster’s greatness. As the psychologist Carl Jung put it in his lectures on Nietzsche’s Zarathustra (1934-9), while it is true that “Nietzsche chose a most dignified and worthy model for his wise old man,” he also took him to be “the founder of the Christian dogma” [of moral objectivity] that Nietzsche so vehemently opposed. He also notes that Zarathustra’s recorded age in Thus Spoke Zarathustra is the same as “the legendary age of Christ when he began his teaching career.”"

https://philosophynow.org/issues/93/Nietzsches_Dance_With_Zarathustra

There is a reference above to the movie Unbreakable (2000). I can't recall whether I have seen that.

The blurb for the movie on IMDB is "A man learns something extraordinary about himself after a devastating accident." Sounds a bit Sethian.
« Last Edit: November 15, 2020, 01:44:52 AM by Sena »

Offline jbseth

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Quote from: Sena
jbseth, it appears that Nietzsche may have made his Zarathustra the opposite of the Persian Zoroaster


Hi Sena, Hi All,

That could very well be. I don’t really know very much about philosophy.

I do know quite a bit more about the various major world’s religions, Judeo / Christian historical scholarship and psychology. That is, I’ve read quite a bit more about these subjects than I have on any or all of the various philosophies (Socrates, Plato, St. Augustine, St. Thomas, Kant, Nietzsche, etc.)

I definitely know more about Zoroastrianism than I do about “Nietzsche”.

From what little I do know about “Nietzsche”, I’m not sure I would have been a big fan of his ideas.

It seems to me that a lot of the later philosophers (those from the middle ages on) were largely just reacting to and responding to the ideas of Christianity, the Christian church and the God of the Christian church. It's as if nobody else's beliefs, (the Jewish people, the Moslems, the Hindu's, the Buddhists, the Taoists, the Aboriginies, the Native Americans, the Polynesians, etc) even mattered. That's a pretty limited view of philosophy.


It seems to me that a lot of scientists do the same thing. They only react/respond to the beliefs about the God of Christianity and completely overlook or disregard the beliefs about the God of the Hindu's, as well as the Taoists and Buddhists beliefs.

-jbseth

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