De Chirico, enormous influence on the Surrealists, repudiated that work of his

Started by Mark M, June 19, 2022, 08:02:45 PM

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Mark M

 
De Chirico strongly influenced the Surrealist movement:

Yves Tanguy wrote how one day in 1922 he saw one of de Chirico's paintings in an art dealer's window, and was so impressed by it he resolved on the spot to become an artist—although he had never even held a brush. Other Surrealists who acknowledged de Chirico's influence include Max Ernst, Salvador Dalí, and René Magritte, who described his first sighting of de Chirico's The Song of Love [below] as "one of the most moving moments of my life: my eyes saw thought for the first time."*

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/1/1b/De_Chirico%27s_Love_Song.jpg/220px-De_Chirico%27s_Love_Song.jpg
 
In November 1919, de Chirico published an article in Valori plastici entitled "The Return of Craftsmanship", in which he advocated a return to traditional methods and iconography.[18] This article heralded an abrupt change in his artistic orientation, as he adopted a classicizing manner inspired by such old masters as Raphael and Signorelli, and became part of the post-war return to order in the arts. He became an outspoken opponent of modern art.

In the early 1920s, the Surrealist writer André Breton discovered one of de Chirico's metaphysical paintings on display in Guillaume's Paris gallery, and was enthralled.[20] Numerous young artists who were similarly affected by de Chirico's imagery became the core of the Paris Surrealist group centered around Breton. In 1924 de Chirico visited Paris and was accepted into the group, although the surrealists were severely critical of his post-metaphysical work.[21]

... His relationship with the Surrealists grew increasingly contentious, as they publicly disparaged his new work; by 1926 he had come to regard them as "cretinous and hostile".[23] They soon parted ways in acrimony.

...
 
The Evil Genius of a King:
 
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/1/1f/Giorgio_de_Chirico%2C_1914-15%2C_Le_mauvais_g%C3%A9nie_d%E2%80%99un_roi_%28The_Evil_Genius_of_a_King%29%2C_oil_on_canvas%2C_61_%C3%97_50.2_cm%2C_Museum_of_Modern_Art%2C_New_York.jpg/220px-Giorgio_de_Chirico%2C_1914-15%2C_Le_mauvais_g%C3%A9nie_d%E2%80%99un_roi_%28The_Evil_Genius_of_a_King%29%2C_oil_on_canvas%2C_61_%C3%97_50.2_cm%2C_Museum_of_Modern_Art%2C_New_York.jpg
 
De Chirico's later paintings [below] never received the same critical praise as did those from his metaphysical period. He resented this, as he thought his later work was better and more mature. He nevertheless produced backdated "self-forgeries" both to profit from his earlier success, and as an act of revenge—retribution for the critical preference for his early work.[24] He also denounced many paintings attributed to him in public and private collections as forgeries**.
 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giorgio_de_Chirico
 
1952 piece:

https://fondazionedechirico.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/inv.-49-Cavallo-bianco-in-riva-al-mare-1952-olio-su-tela-cm-50x60.png
 
*Also during 1922, the poet Marcel Lecomte showed Magritte a reproduction of Giorgio de Chirico's The Song of Love (painted in 1914). The work brought Magritte to tears; he described this as "one of the most moving moments of my life: my eyes saw thought for the first time."
 
**During 1947–48, Magritte's "Vache period," he painted in a provocative and crude Fauve style. During this time, Magritte supported himself through the production of fake Picassos, Braques, and de Chiricos—a fraudulent repertoire he was later to expand into the printing of forged banknotes during the lean postwar period. This venture was undertaken alongside his brother Paul and fellow Surrealist and "surrogate son" Marcel Mariën, to whom had fallen the task of selling the forgeries.[13] At the end of 1948, Magritte returned to the style and themes of his pre-war surrealistic art.
 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ren%C3%A9_Magritte#Career
 
McCartney owned some Magritte's.
 
The logo of Apple Corps, The Beatles' company, is inspired by Magritte's Le Jeu de Mourre, a 1966 painting.
 
https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-g10uZl17Ygw/W40ys9SZQMI/AAAAAAAAq64/zIzFw1ftsUUWRKsOIRK0Tg7gFcyC_6BvwCLcBGAs/s1600/au_voir.jpg
 
 
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inavalan

Although I don't always write it explicitly, it should be inferred that everything I post is "my belief", "my opinion" on that subject, at that moment.

Mark M

Let's see, how about this:

Does such a big turnabout that De Chirico exhibited re art and his art represent a change to a probable self?

Not saying it's the same, but here is Seth on Chuck Colson's turnabout:

'No one is as fanatical, and no one can be more cruel, than the self-righteous. It is very easy for such persons "to become [religiously] converted" after such episodes (as Watergate), lining themselves up once more on the side of good, searching for "the power of fellowship," turning to church rather than government, hearing in one way or another the voice of God.'

—NoME Part Three: Chapter 8: Session 856, May 24, 1979

inavalan

Quote from: Mark M on June 19, 2022, 09:43:48 PMLet's see, how about this:

Does such a big turnabout that De Chirico exhibited re art and his art represent a change to a probable self?

Not saying it's the same, but here is Seth on Chuck Colson's turnabout:

'No one is as fanatical, and no one can be more cruel, than the self-righteous. It is very easy for such persons "to become [religiously] converted" after such episodes (as Watergate), lining themselves up once more on the side of good, searching for "the power of fellowship," turning to church rather than government, hearing in one way or another the voice of God.'

—NoME Part Three: Chapter 8: Session 856, May 24, 1979

I don't think that that quote relates to "probable selves".

A quick search for "probable self" yields, among others:

Quote"Each probable self you see also has future selves. This multidimensional identity is a psychological structure with which we shall be dealing in our discussions. The term includes the whole self as it consists of the self that you know, probable selves, reincarnated selves, and selves more highly developed than the self that you know.

These make up the basic identity structure of one whole self. Again, this does not mean that the portions are not independent and individual. Also, the divisions are arbitrary to a large degree, for they can indeed be carried further, for example, to the entity."

—TES7 Session 309 December 14, 1966

As I understand this , there are practically an infinite number of probable selves, from which through successive choices (always in the "spacious present") a life-line is drawn. So, the two phases of De Chirico's art belong to De Chirico's life-line. The entity that incarnated as him, drew only one life-line during that incarnation. The others are potential / probable but weren't actualized. Even if you jumped from one probability to another, you'd end up with only one actualized life-line.

The life-line that one remembers having experienced might actually be different from the one he actually drew through the physical-hyperspace (time, 3d-space, probable-reality). People experiencing the same present-moment, present-3d-space, present-probable-reality, may remember different past life-lines that brought them to that point (which may also be quite different from those that they went through).
Although I don't always write it explicitly, it should be inferred that everything I post is "my belief", "my opinion" on that subject, at that moment.

Deb

The probable selves issue: they are constant in our lives and De Chirico's sudden decision "resolved on the spot to become an artist—although he had never even held a brush" certainly feels like he jumped tracks. I think Seth said it happens often where our probable life paths intersect.

I'm surprised I never heard of De Chirico. I have a graphic design degree and had to take several fine art classes during the course. His art definitely appears to have influenced the surrealist movement. Fun stuff.


Mark M

Yes.

It was Surrealist Yves Tanguy who wrote how one day in 1922 he saw one of de Chirico's paintings in an art dealer's window, and was so impressed by it he resolved on the spot to become an artist—although he had never even held a brush.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yves_Tanguy

Here is a Tanguy piece:

The Palace of the Windowed Rocks

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e5/Thepalaceofthewindowedrocks.jpg


Deb

Quote from: Mark M on June 21, 2022, 08:54:26 AMwas so impressed by it he resolved on the spot to become an artist—although he had never even held a brush

That's a little eerie, same wording. The painting is really stunning, I'd love to be able to see it in person to get a closer look. Here's a larger version, it's more colorful. I actually prefer the colors in the one you linked, they're more subtle and moody.

https://uploads5.wikiart.org/images/yves-tanguy/palace-on-windows-rocks.jpg