Author Topic: On having expectations  (Read 1936 times)

Offline Icarus

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A friend once said that she refused to have any expectations of life, and I shared this quote with her.

"Again, expectations are not only vital in the formation of physical constructions, but they also determine what inner data of all available, will be received by the individual; and then the individual interprets the data in terms of the same expectations. The core of individuality, then, is the individual’s expectations, for he will truly get what he wants, individually and collectively. If a man wants to change his fate, desire is not enough, but expectation is. Desire may grow into expectation, but alone it is not enough. Expectation is actually the main trigger that switches inner data into the realm of physical construction. Without it, no physical construction results."

The Early Sessions, Book 2
Session 76, Page 276
It is what it is, but it becomes what you make it

Offline Deb

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Great quote, important message.

YEARS ago I decided that what caused the most strife in relationships, any relationships, between people, whether romantic, marriage (different than romantic, lol), parent and child, friends... was expectations of one person of the other. A person's expectations of another's behavior, based on personal beliefs and needs, and the failure of the other person to meet those expectations, do cause a multitude of disappointment and problems.

But... that's an entirely different meaning of expectation than what your quote addresses. And it's a concept that I've heard repeated over and over for many years, since I've gotten into Seth, Law of Attraction, even Joe Dispenza. Yes, it's one thing to desire some sort of change in life. But desire has little effect, if expectation of the desired result does not exist. And to add strong emotion—only adds fuel to that fire.

Great, valuable quote. Thank you for that!


Offline SumariDeb

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Yeah, the world is full of people who yearn for better things, but never really expect them.

What I do love is that I find I get what I want, but never exactly in the way I "expected", so I am still surprised and delighted.   :) (and who doesn't love a good surprise?)

Debbie

John Sorensen

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A friend once said that she refused to have any expectations of life, and I shared this quote with her.

"Again, expectations are not only vital in the formation of physical constructions, but they also determine what inner data of all available, will be received by the individual; and then the individual interprets the data in terms of the same expectations. The core of individuality, then, is the individual’s expectations, for he will truly get what he wants, individually and collectively. If a man wants to change his fate, desire is not enough, but expectation is. Desire may grow into expectation, but alone it is not enough. Expectation is actually the main trigger that switches inner data into the realm of physical construction. Without it, no physical construction results."

The Early Sessions, Book 2
Session 76, Page 276

Greg Braden and Joe Dispenza both talk about this topic at length.

Intention, Desire, willing, wanting, imagining, expecting - use whatever words or ideas work for you.

But the short of it is (and Seth also talks this) is that you playfully imagine the future event or state you wish to be or achieve as if it has ALREADY HAPPENED. What you are doing when you focus your intention in that state is narrowing down the quantum field of infinite possibilities to the possibilities you want to happen. Intention combined with visualization and strong emotion + expectation etc go together.

Also, what is happening is that you mind/body taps in that  "future" state, pulls that state or event back to your present, and then lives AS IF it has already happened.

So what you are doing there is changing your feeling-tone, what you project out to the world, and expect of yourself.

The way I do it is usually by sitting and meditating and imagining the event in my mind, in as much vivid detail as possible, as having already happened.

But there are many other ways, I sometimes practice the same sort of thing on long walks, or just sitting at night while reading a book, I playfully imagine a particular scenario playing out favourably etc.


--

I've often read comments on this topic along the lines of "But does this really work? "What am I doing wrong?" etc.

My answer is that you are already creating your personal reality, you have been your entire life, it is not possible NOT to do it. The difference is, by practicing particular exercises, you are learning to do so consciously, rather than unconsciously. It is one of the "challenges" of living in the material world. But I find it mostly fun.

As Seth says, we are learning to handle and express our emotions, feelings, creations before we move on to other frameworks of existence where the "rules" are somewhat different.

Imagine for example a realm where whatever you thought, imagined, desired and dwelled upon appeared instantaneously.

Now imagine you are very depressed or suicidal, would you want everything to happen that you thought of?
Would you not prefer to learn in an environment where there is a [gap] between what you think and feel, and what you create in your personal reality?


"Your mind and attitude can make a heaven of hell, and a hell of heaven"
« Last Edit: October 22, 2015, 05:25:49 PM by John Sorensen »

Offline JimK

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Yes, I think I like having a gap in what I consciously create. I notice that when driving, the gap is generaly small in the conditions I want or expect, but with some other things the gap can be quite large but the gap is still there.

I've also noticed the results of my conscious creations (but not with the driving example) usually do not come about or materialize as I'd imagined, visuslized or whatever. But when I think about it, the results always seem to come about in a way that fits the flow most naturally.

Offline Roy

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Quote from: Icarus
A friend once said that she refused to have any expectations of life, and I shared this quote with her.

"Again, expectations are not only vital in the formation of physical constructions, but they also determine what inner data of all available, will be received by the individual; and then the individual interprets the data in terms of the same expectations. The core of individuality, then, is the individual’s expectations, for he will truly get what he wants, individually and collectively. If a man wants to change his fate, desire is not enough, but expectation is. Desire may grow into expectation, but alone it is not enough. Expectation is actually the main trigger that switches inner data into the realm of physical construction. Without it, no physical construction results."

The Early Sessions, Book 2
Session 76, Page 276

Thanks for this quote! This is a very useful one for me in these days :)

Offline Batfan007

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Quote from: JimK
Yes, I think I like having a gap in what I consciously create. I notice that when driving, the gap is generaly small in the conditions I want or expect, but with some other things the gap can be quite large but the gap is still there.

I've also noticed the results of my conscious creations (but not with the driving example) usually do not come about or materialize as I'd imagined, visuslized or whatever. But when I think about it, the results always seem to come about in a way that fits the flow most naturally.

I find the smaller the gap, the less people involved, and it its mainly just concerns me, then a short gap. But the more people involved, often (but not always) a longer gap.
Like if I want a sandwich, very small gap.
If I wanted to build a house from scratch, lot bigger gap.

 

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