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Comic Relief & Entertainment / Re: Laughter is the best medicine!
« Last post by jbseth on Today at 05:22:12 PM »
Quote from: Deb
I love dogs

Me too.  :)

- jbseth
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Comic Relief & Entertainment / Re: Laughter is the best medicine!
« Last post by Deb on Today at 05:19:56 PM »
Quote from: jbseth
When I first saw the small picture, I couldn’t tell exactly what medium was being used for the horse and the rest of the image on the table. At first I thought that someone was doing a “foodie” thing where they were using ground beef for the horse, light green lettuce for the grass and dark green lettuce for the forest in the background.

You must be hungry.  ;D

Dog: Other reactions (Facebook) were "in-bread" and "wonder dog" lol. I love dogs.

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Comic Relief & Entertainment / Re: Laughter is the best medicine!
« Last post by jbseth on Today at 05:02:36 PM »
Hi Deb,

That’s really creative.

When I first saw the small picture, I couldn’t tell exactly what medium was being used for the horse and the rest of the image on the table. At first I thought that someone was doing a “foodie” thing where they were using ground beef for the horse, light green lettuce for the grass and dark green lettuce for the forest in the background.

Then when I enlarged the image, I saw that the image on the table consisted of the puzzle pieces themselves.  That’s very creative, I love it.


Then that pure “bread” dog. That was really funny.

I guess from this that pure bread dog’s have square shaped heads???   :)

Thanks for sharing those, Deb.

-jbseth
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Comic Relief & Entertainment / Re: Laughter is the best medicine!
« Last post by Deb on Today at 04:34:49 PM »
A pure bread dog.
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Non-Seth Topics/Discussions / Re: The coronavirus
« Last post by Deb on Today at 03:26:47 PM »
VERY cool video, I love how there are people in times like these that get very resourceful and creative. And so rewarding for you, I'm sure, to be a help in a time like this. I bet you had no clue when you were designing it that it would be used to save lives in a pandemic. Want to go back and talk with the you that designed it?

Every day I hear stories of companies and individuals who really step up to the plate and help others, whether its donations of medical goods, money, food, or those that dig right into researching the virus, treatments, prevention and cures. And the people in the medical fields are working as hard as they can... all heroes in my mind.

BTW I thought your dream and interpretation were very cool, feels right to me. My dreams tend to be mundane and monotonous. I was having a dream about being in an amazing house this morning and was walking with and telling a young woman how I would love to be able to buy the house. When I work up, I realized we'd had had our arms around each other's waist as we were walking (we seemed to be related somehow) and my first thought was "I'm not keeping social distance in my dreams."  ::)
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Comic Relief & Entertainment / Re: Laughter is the best medicine!
« Last post by Deb on Today at 02:52:01 PM »
OK I saw this one today and thought it was hysterical. I love how creative people are!

It also struck me funny because I bought a paint by number on Amazon last week, an extremely complex but beautiful design. Otherwise I wouldn't have bothered. I felt it would be similar to doing a jigsaw puzzle. I'll probably open the box when it finally arrives, and decide to frame it as is, without the paint. :)
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Miscellaneous / Re: TMI
« Last post by Deb on Today at 02:48:03 PM »
Quote from: jbseth
When we put these events in this kind of context, we can see that each one of these scenarios, seem to be very unique and individual in and of themselves. And yet, they also seem to occur randomly (or maybe not randomly) across time.

Are these events challenges that we, mankind, intentionally put in place for learning purposes, and for value fulfillment?

According to Seth, yes. I know we (no everyone however) learned a lot from the Holocaust, Three Mile Island (and Chernobyl) hopefully. The rest, I can't say specifically what we learned, but if we keep creating events like these apparently we still have more to learn. Or we forget.

You could go way back in history, with ice ages, biblical disasters, volcanos and earthquakes, etc. and see that there are a whole lot of dramas for humans and anything that gets close to us. We just can't seem to have peaceful existence for any length of time. I guess we don't learn much when we're not dealing with death and disaster, or the peaceful times in between are there for us to reflect and absorb what just happened.

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Non-Seth Topics/Discussions / Re: The coronavirus
« Last post by LarryH on Today at 02:00:36 PM »
Here's a 6-minute YouTube of someone demonstrating how the ventilator that I designed can be used for four patients at once: https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=364&v=uClq978oohY&feature=emb_title

I was not looking for this, it was a link in a news feed that I subscribe to. I had heard of someone using a different ventilator who claimed that it could be used on 9 patients at once. Most low-end ventilators would probably not be able to do this (such as the portable type that GM will be manufacturing for a different company).
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Miscellaneous / Re: TMI
« Last post by Sena on Today at 12:57:23 PM »
Quote from: jbseth
Are these events challenges that we, mankind, intentionally put in place for learning purposes, and for value fulfillment?
jbseth, yes for learning purposes, especially about the meaning of death. Many people see death as the "end", or they have fantasies about heaven and hell.
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Miscellaneous / TMI
« Last post by jbseth on Today at 11:15:41 AM »
Hi All,

I was looking at Bing today and one of the features of Bing, that I personally enjoy is their, “Today in History” section.

Today in history, on March 28, 1979, the Three Mile Island nuclear reactor facility near Harrisburg,  Pennsylvania, suffered a “partial meltdown”.

This is one of the events that Seth talks about in his “Mass Events” book.

http://www.bing.com/search?q=three+mile+island+accident&FORM=OTDHYL

Gee’s that was 41 years ago.


I was 24 years old at the time and as I remember it, it was an interesting time. Kind of like today in some ways, people were wondering what was going to happen with this. Would the nuclear reactor actually melt down? Would nuclear contamination result and potentially harm millions of people? The mass potential probable realities that we could choose, coming out of that situation, were open to us at that time, in a way very similar to what’s happening today.

History seems to repeat itself with this same kind of theme every so often. Starting at the beginning of the 20th century, we had WW1, then the great depression, then WW2, then the Kennedy Assassination, then Watergate, then TMI, then the first Gulf War, then 9/11, then the second Gulf war, and then today - Covid 19.  (There are also many others, like the Cuban missile crisis that nearly resulted in nuclear between the US and the USSR, the Vietnam war, and the 1960's Vietnam war protests, etc).



When we put these events in this kind of context, we can see that each one of these scenarios, seem to be very unique and individual in and of themselves. And yet, they also seem to occur randomly (or maybe not randomly) across time. 

Are these events challenges that we, mankind, intentionally put in place for learning purposes, and for value fulfillment?

- jbseth 
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